Wednesday , August 23 2017
Greenfields SOLE
A SOLE in action at Greenfield Community College, UK.

Seize every moment to build curious dispositions

This week, Adam Voigt shares insights from Professor Sugata Mitra, designer of the ‘Hole in the Wall’ experiments. Voigt suggests we fill the gaps between scheduled learning activities with mind-expanding questions – Mitra style.

The great Professor Sugata Mitra was again in Australia recently posing some big and provocative questions at the conferences where he was a featured speaker.  Mitra is famous for his ‘Hole in the Wall’ experiment in the slums of India where he proved that children can learn … even in a foreign language … even without any education … and even without teachers.  Ouch!

The grenade that Mitra was this time dropping on our educative assumptions was around assessment.  Speaking at a WA Secondary School Executives Association conference, he opined that our obsessive pattern of assessing by using only knowledge level exams and tests is counterproductive to the capabilities our young people will need to be employable in a global economy.

Mitra wants us to ask big questions and to challenge young people to be more curious and enquiring.  He wants us to ask them “Where does the universe end?” and “Why do people cry?”.

The best explanation for the crying question I’ve heard is that it’s a psychological “button” that’s pushed when emotions are so strong or the combination of emotions so complex that self-expression verbally is too difficult for us.

I’m not sure about that.  I think I’ll ask some year 12 students … or perhaps I’d get a more honest answer from some preps!

In the gaps, this semester – in the five minutes while you’re waiting for a bell or for a bus – could we ask our students some big questions to build the curiosity and problem solving qualities that we know deep down that they’ll really need?

For more from Sugata Mitra, including his Self Organising Learning Environments (SOLE)s, read this interview  published by School News.

About Adam Voigt

Adam Voigt
Adam Voigt is the Founder & Director of Real Schools. Built upon years of experience as a successful Principal, Real Schools helps schools to build and sustain strong, relational School Cultures. A speaker of local and international renown, Adam has delivered a TED Talk and is the schools/education expert for The Project”.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

15 + 16 =

Check Also

Maths anxiety is causing a shortage of young scientists

Does the thought of doing long division, or solving a bit of algebra give you the shivers? You’re likely to have maths anxiety. In our recent research, my colleagues and I found that in 80% of countries, girls have more negative feelings towards maths than boys.

It’s robotics FIRST for these STEM students

Robotics students at Barker College in Sydney are still collecting themselves after a whirlwind of competitions, and a year of dazzling success. School News spoke with robotics coordinator and computer science teacher, Lael Grant, for the details.